How Much Does Kitchen Remodeling Cost

What do I need to know before remodeling a kitchen?

If you sometimes have trouble deciding what to make for dinner, a kitchen renovation can feel paralyzing. But take heart: It doesn’t really matter much which backsplash tiles or faucet you choose. As long as you get the big stuff right, you’ll be thrilled with your new kitchen. These five rules will help you get the best result at the right price.

Keep your outlay in sync with your home.

To avoid overimproving, cap your kitchen renovation budget at 15% of your home’s value, suggests John Bredemeyer, president of Realcorp, a national appraisal firm based in Omaha. (Check your town assessor’s site or a real estate site). For budgeting purposes, figure about 30% on cabinets; 14% on appliances; 10% on countertops; 5% on lighting; 4% on plumbing fixtures; 2% to 3% on paint; 1% to 2% on tiles, and 35% on construction costs, such as windows, flooring, and labor. For a house worth $250,000, that translates to about $11,000 on cabinets, $5,250 on appliances; $3,750 on countertops, $1,875 on lighting; $1,500 on plumbing fixtures; $1,125 on paint; $750 on tiles; and $12,000 on construction costs.

It pays to pay for your design.

There’s no such thing as a free lunch—or a free plan for renovating the place where you prepare lunch. While the designers at home centers, kitchen stores, and cabinet shops won’t charge you a fee, they aren’t working for free. Their paychecks come from the retailer or manufacturers of the products they’re selling, which limits your choices. What’s more, in-store designers, especially those working at home centers, tend to be relatively inexperienced with actual renovation work, says Portland, Ore., kitchen designer Chelly Wentworth. Since your project will only be as good as its design, skip the freebies and hire a veteran designer without any conflicts of interest. Expect to pay 3 to 10 % of your project costs for design—a fair price for a design that really works.

 

You can expand the kitchen without busting the budget.

Unless your house was built within the last few decades, your kitchen is almost certainly undersized. If you’re doing a major renovation (in other words, tearing things out and starting over), now is the time to expand the kitchen; here’s how to do it affordably.

  • Steal space. By repurposing square footage from an adjacent hallway or a no-longer-needed chimney, closet, or porch, you can expand your kitchen at perhaps half the per-square-foot costs of an addition. Exactly how much you’ll pay depends on the project and location, but you might pay $100 to $300 per square foot for recapturing space vs. $200 to $400 for building new.
  • Open the floorplan. Even if you don’t expand the kitchen at all, you can make it feel much bigger by taking down a wall and creating an open floorplan between the kitchen and adjacent dining, family, or living room. In the context of a renovation project, this may cost $1,000 to $6,000, depending on whether the wall is load-bearing or contains major plumbing or electrical lines.
  • Bump out. If you need to expand, you may be able to add a two-foot extension along one whole side of the kitchen by hanging it off the house like a bay window rather than putting it on a foundation. That could save you several thousand bucks compared with a full-fledged addition.

 

Things to Consider Before Remodeling Your Kitchen

Renovating parts of your home can be a very rewarding process and, when done well, can add considerable value to your property. There are a range of options when it comes to remodeling your home, but if your budget can only stretch to remodeling one room, that room should be the kitchen. It’s estimated that a new kitchen will improve the value of your property by around 6% . It’s also one of the most important rooms for prospective buyers, so it’s worth some serious consideration.

Kitchen remodeling is about more than just aesthetics. You can also focus on better utilization of space, add extra functionality or integrate your kitchen with other areas of your home. Determine exactly what you want to achieve before you start planning your kitchen remodeling project. This will help you to streamline the renovation process and ensure everyone involved is on the same page from the offset.

Set a realistic budget

Before you begin remodeling your kitchen, it’s important to consider your budget against the value of your property. There’s no point in investing $20,000 in a premium new kitchen if your property is only worth $200,000 – you simply won’t get your money back. Equally, if you remodel on a low budget but your property is worth upwards of $500,000, you could end up devaluing your home.

Do your homework and try to arrive at an estimated cost before you go out and start buying stuff. Once you understand exactly how much you are able to invest, and what your return on that investment will be, you can begin designing your dream kitchen.

 

Plan your new kitchen appliances carefully

It’s common for people to leave appliances to the last minute when planning their kitchen remodeling. This may mean you run out of budget, or face with unexpected costs, prompting you to opt for lower quality products. It’s important to plan appliances carefully, as going for lower quality could end up costing you more, further down the line.

When looking for appliances, consider:

  • Quality and longevity
  • Energy efficiency
  • Size
  • Features and technologies
  • Flexibility and ease of use

There’s no hard and fast rule for how much you should spend on new kitchen appliances. The quality and range of appliances you go for will depend on your overall budget. Built-in appliances  are an extremely effective solution. They fit perfectly within the dimensions of your kitchen and give a more seamless, elegant finish. As a general rule, you should leave about 20% of your budget for new appliances.

 

Contemplate an Addition

Gaining more space is often a common motivation for remodeling a kitchen. Still, before you knock out the walls, weigh the cost of the extra space. You may be able to use the money spent on an expansion for quality cabinets or high-end appliances instead.

If it’s truly more space you’re after, look to adjoining rooms and places where you can steal square footage. For example, it might make sense to take from a hodgepodge of smaller rooms (laundry room, pantry, bathroom, and mudroom) and merge them into one super-functional kitchen space. After that, discuss your project with a certified kitchen planner or architect. A good space planner will be able to reconfigure the walls, the ceiling, or the windows to make a kitchen space feel larger without the expense of a room addition.

Tips To Find The Best Home Builder

What Are the Advantages of Working With a Small Home Builder?

It is true that working with a large builder has many benefits, but working with a small home builder has its own benefits. In fact, if you are not looking to build a large building, the benefits of working with a small builder can outweigh the benefits of working with a large builder. Builders working on a small scale have the following advantages that large builders often lack.

Custom home builders can construct your new home where you want it

Custom builders are generally working on only one venture at a time. Resultantly, they are not frightened to look into choices.

By contrast, big builders think big, which translates to the fact that their perception is not in terms of houses, but terms of developments. To fashion a development, the big builders need to acquire and locate bigger pieces of land. The location for the building is limited to these. These pieces of land are seldom available near urban centers, denotating that if you don’t require a long journey, a big builder may not be of any use to you.

 

You’re an individual and you would like your house to function too

Generally, you can anticipate nearly complete customisation out of a little builder. To start, a custom builder is functioning using a larger selection of design choices, frequently built on a single lot. This permits you to choose most details of your new residence. In addition, by definition, a little builder will probably have fewer workers, meaning he will almost always be onsite. You’ll have ample chance to modify things you dislike. Your contractor is also quite prone to accommodate you into these places because he’s very likely to reside in the region where he works and his professional reputation depends, in no small part, in your own satisfaction.

Volume builders build houses, normally many at a time, according to a much limited library of house plans. They are going to have bought the majority of the substances and pre-determined all your home’s design components nicely ahead. You are able to”customise” your house with your collections of countertops, appliances, etc., however, the contractors are on a really strict program, and are not necessarily inclined to create each the little changes you want to see. If you are building in a market place, possibly on a mountain or on a narrow lot, the larger developers may not discuss your vision.

You might have purchased that land on a mountain especially with a view to placing your home atop it, but your quantity builder can disagree, preferring to dig in the mountain and generate a set block on which to construct among the pre-created designs.

 

Smaller builders can be more knowledgeable

A smaller, local builder will be more likely to have built on similar terrain. Having built in your area, a custom builder will be able to tell you with confidence that, for instance, there is rock near the surface of the ground in your area, making excavation impossibility. This sort of prior knowledge can end up saving you money in site costs.

 

 

Custom creates often happen to be of higher high quality

First way that large builders keep their prices thus low is by acquiring parts of homes developed in a plant, in that case introduced to the web page, badly affecting both this top quality and the components themselves.

Personalized home constructors are far less most likely (or able) to participate in this practice, usually ensuing in a much better built home.

 

More Aware of Your Needs

As most small home builders have the extensive local knowledge, and they are available to discuss and share this knowledge with you, they become more aware of your needs. They can recommend you a number of things, like the size of your home and the layout of your garden, which will prove valuable in the coming years.

Flexible Locations

Small builders are often more likely to travel to the location you have chosen for your home. large builders either do not engage in the projects with inconvenient location or only send the lower level staff to such locations.

In conclusion, larger builders do take the benefits of working fast. They could provide bigger homes for smaller costs, but that comes at the expense of this individualisation that probably drove one to build, rather than buy, a house in the first location.